Decorative inlays inlay kits
 Explore Your Creativity  What Will You Learn?

Cutting Voids in the Base Material

WHAT you're doing:

Affixing the template to the base material, securing the assembly to the workbench, setting the depth of the cut and routing the void.

Put the Router BUSHING ON

WHAT you're doing:

  • If routing a Void the bushing gets placed on the router
    inlay kit.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • To position the router bit correctly inside the template
    • If you DON’T have the bushing on this happens.
      Notice the router bit hole outside the filled void area???

 

HOW to do it:

  • Firmly push the bushing all the way down on the collar.

Bushing ON the brass inlay kit

Bushing left off when cutting a void

Set the Cutting Depth on the Router

WHAT you're doing:

  • Adjusting the depth of the cut made by the router bit.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • You want the void to be slightly shallower than the
    thickness of the inlay material.
    •  Once assembled the inlay material should extrude
      slightly out from the base material.
    •  Usually, it is easier to sand the inlay down to the level
      of the base material than the entire base to the level of the inlay.

 

HOW to do it:

  • Each router is different — follow the instructions on your router to set the depth.

Setting the depth of the cut

Routing the Rough Cut Void

WHAT you're doing:

  • Making the first cut to create a void in the base material.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • To remove the majority of the wood in the void area.

 

HOW to do it:

  • Position the router on the template with the bit, not
    extended yet, inside the void area.
  • Turn the router on.
  • Plunge the router extending the bit fully into the void area
  • Cut around the edges of the shape then move the router back and forth, inside the shape, to remove the majority of the material.
  • Repeat for each void on the layer being worked on.

Rough cut  of the void area

Clean the Void of Debris

WHAT you're doing:

  • Getting rid of debris left after making the first cut.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • Left over material in the void can interfere with the
    router when making the final cuts.

 

HOW to do it:

  • Use a shop vac to suck up all the loose material.
  • A pick is handy to get out chunks that are wedged in the wood.
  • Make sure lip between the void and the template are clean and free of debris.

Rough cut cleaned of debris

Route the Final Cut

WHAT you're doing:

  • Making a final router pass around each void.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • To create a clean sharp edge around the void to provide
    a better fit for the inlay.
  • Remove the remaining material in the void.
  • Gives the bottom of the void a reasonable flat surface.

 

HOW to do it:

  • Route around the sides of the shape to create sharp edges.
  • Apply firm pressure to keep the bushing against the side wall of the template.
  • Go back and forth to remove any last chunks from the middle of the void.
  • If there are any bumps left in the void you can use a small wood chisel to remove the burrs.
    • You want a flat bottom so the inlay piece fits all the way into the void.

Final cut after template was removed

Remove the Template

WHAT you're doing:

  • Prying the template from the base material.

 

WHY you're doing it:

  • So you can insert the inlay into the void(s).

 

HOW to do it:

  • Slide a paint scraper (mine is 3″ across) between the
    template and the wood to pry them apart.
    • Denatured alcohol helps remove the tape.
  •  Wiggle the scraper around to loosen the tape around all the areas where tape has been applied.
  •  Don’t pry to hard on the template or it can be damaged!
  •  Peel off the duct tape from the template and base material.
    •  The longer the tape is stuck to a surface the harder it is to remove.

Prying the template off

© EZInlays 2016